Aging & Osteopenia: What have you been told?

Leada_M
Guide
Guide

I was just speaking with my mom (she is in her 60's) tonight about why it's important she lifts weights when she goes to the gym. She tends to stick to the elliptical, treadmill, and swim because she likes her cardio. I'm so grateful she's moving frequently, but I know women after 50 experience a change in bone density as things adjust in the body...anyways, after a talk I finally convinced her to start lifting weights more regularly and she boasted tonight she could bicep curl 12 lbs!  *PROUD daughter moment!*

 

I realized in that moment that I'm sure she isn't the women who doesn't know why lifting weights is beneficial for bone density!!... so I'm curious. What have you been told by your doctor about bone health and managing it (if anything)?

 

P.S. Did you miss the write up on BONE HEALTH in the Women's Health space I shared on this? Check it out HERE!

5 REPLIES 5

jennj
Member
Thank you for sharing this article I found it really helpful! So proud of your mom too, that’s wonderful.

I’m so happy you found it helpful! Please let me know if you have any questions ☺️ and yes - she is a rockstar!

kathleenruns
Member

Yeah! Congrats to your mom.  I just turned 50 and am really trying to increase my strength work -- I tend to go to cardio if given the choice.  Thanks for posting the article.

Good for you for making the intention to strength train more! And my pleasure 🙂

Blee
Member

Well that's a timely topic for me!  I recently listened to the Osteoporosis and Bone Health Summit that had 3 different experts in exercise speak. What I heard freaked me out!  If you are diagnosed osteoporotic, then you should be very careful doing full forward folds, twisting and bending at the same time, doing plow pose, everything I do frequently in yoga and pilates classes.  I am 60+ with osteopenia and recently had a Dexa bone density scan because I've needed to take prednisone (bone stealing) for a chronic condition. My spine in particular had degenerated (lower score) from the last time whereas my hip was unchanged.  I have never been more active in my life than these last few years so it was concerning to me.  Speaking to my dr last week about it relieved my concern.  She said all women that are postmenopausal eventually are osteopenia and may move to osteoporotic due to the lack of protective estrogen.  The Dexa numbers don't tell the whole story.  You could have "dense" bones but they could crumble if you fell or they can be thin but very strong.  She said she had a sedentary 70 yr old patient who decided on her own to get a rebounder.  This was disastrous as she immediately had a spine fracture. But I have been fairly active in my 50's and 60's and hope to keep it up. I forgot to mention that I take bone supportive supplements such as calcium, K2, D3 as well as go to the gym daily for cardio, yoga, pilates, barre classes and weight lifting, TRX and resistance training on my own.